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NCJ Number: NCJ 196148     Find in a Library
Title: Mediating Citizen Complaints Against Police Officers: A Guide for Police and Community Leaders
Author(s): Samuel Walker ; Carol Archbold ; Leigh Herbst
Corporate Author: University of Nebraska - Omaha
Dept of Criminal Justice
United States of America
Date Published: 08/2002
Page Count: 111
Sponsoring Agency: Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS)
US Dept of Justice
United States of America
Grant Number: 1999-CK-WX-1016
Sale Source: NCJRS Photocopy Services
Box 6000
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
United States of America

Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS)
US Dept of Justice
Two Constitutional Square
145 N Street, N.E.
Washington, DC 20530
United States of America
Document: Text PDF 
Agency Summary: Agency Summary 
Type: Instructional Material
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: This report provides guidance in helping police and community leaders develop successful mediation programs for addressing citizen complaints against police officers.
Abstract: The first chapter defines mediation as "the informal resolution of a complaint or dispute between two parties through a face-to-face meeting in which a professional mediator serves as a neutral facilitator and where both parties ultimately agree that an acceptable resolution has been reached." The goals of mediation are to achieve understanding of the issues involved in the complaint, solve any problems associated with the complaint, and achieve reconciliation between the parties. The second chapter outlines the potential benefits of mediation for police officers, citizen complainants, police accountability, community policing, the complaint process, and the criminal justice system. The third chapter discusses the key issues in developing a mediation program for citizen complaints against police. Among the issues addressed are voluntary participation, case eligibility, the mediation of racial and ethnic-related complaints, the mediation of complaints by women, potential language and cultural barriers, case screening, police discipline and accountability, and getting both sides to the table. Other issues addressed pertain to the mediation session itself and the enforcement of agreements. Chapter four presents results from a survey of existing citizen complaint mediation programs. The concluding chapter describes a model for a successful mediation program for citizen complaints against police. 100 references
Main Term(s): Complaints against police
Index Term(s): Community relations ; Mediation ; Community policing ; BJA grant-related documents
   
  To cite this abstract, use the following link:
https://www.ncjrs.gov/App/Publications/abstract.aspx?ID=196148

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