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Cover: Juvenile Arrests 2004OJJDP bulletin shows continued decline in juvenile arrest rates
Juvenile Arrests 2004 draws on data from the Federal Bureau of Investigation’s (FBI’s) Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) program. Using UCR data provided by local law enforcement agencies throughout the country, the FBI prepares its annual Crime in the United States report, which summarizes crimes known to the police and arrests made during the reporting calendar year. This information is used to characterize the extent and nature of juvenile crime that comes to the attention of the justice system. Highlights of the bulletin’s findings derived from the UCR data include the following: In 2004, for the 10th consecutive year, the rate of juvenile arrests for Violent Crime Index offenses—murder, forcible rape, robbery, and aggravated assault—declined. Specifically, between 1994 and 2004, the juvenile arrest rate for Violent Crime Index offenses fell 49 percent. As a result, the juvenile violent crime arrest rate in 2004 was the lowest since at least 1980. The juvenile murder arrest rate fell 77 percent from its peak in 1993 to 2004.

Juvenile Arrests 2004, 12 pages

OJJDP updates accountability program manual
The Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) recently updated and posted its online guidance manual for the Juvenile Accountability Block Grants (JABG) program. The manual is designed to help States apply for, receive, obligate, and expend JABG funds (by the State and through subgrants to local governments). The goal of the JABG program is to reduce juvenile offending by supporting accountability-based programs that focus on offenders and State and local juvenile justice systems. Accountability means holding offenders responsible for their delinquent behavior by imposing sanctions or other individualized consequences such as restitution, community service, or victim-offender mediation.

Juvenile Accountability Block Grants Program Guidance Manual 2007, 25 pages

Sharing responsibility for public safety
Although police address many public safety problems effectively in the exercise of their normal authority and expertise, they have come to depend on others to aid them by addressing the conditions that underlie crime and disorder. With this help, the police can more effectively prevent and control such problems. This guide examines how the police can motivate private citizens, businesses, or the government to respond to common crime and disorder problems that do not violate basic standards of propriety and legality.

Shifting and Sharing Responsibility for Public Safety Problems, Problem-Oriented Guides for Police, Response Guide Series No. 3, 65 pages

Cover: Federal Advisory Committee on Juvenile Justice Annual Recommendations Report to the President and Congress of the United StatesAdvisory group issues 2007 recommendations
The Federal Advisory Committee on Juvenile Justice (FACJJ) was established by the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act of 1974, as amended, and is supported by the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP). FACJJ comprises appointed representatives from the State Advisory Groups (SAGs) of each of the 50 States, the District of Columbia, and the 5 U.S. territories. Its role is to advise the President and Congress on matters related to juvenile justice and delinquency prevention, to advise the OJJDP Administrator on the work of OJJDP, and to evaluate the progress of juvenile justice activities and projects. FACJJ’s 2007 Annual Recommendations Report to the President and Congress of the United States outlines critical concerns and issues that FACJJ members and their State SAGs have identified. It contains 15 recommendations based on the States’ primary juvenile justice concerns.

Federal Advisory Committee on Juvenile Justice Annual Recommendations Report to the President and Congress of the United States, 40 pages

Applying business management principles to policing
This publication summarizes the key business management principles articulated by Jim Collins in his best-selling book Good to Great and applies them to law enforcement. The publication is the result of a 1-day executive session, funded by the Office of Community Oriented Policing Services and hosted by the Police Executive Research Forum, in which leaders from the public sector discussed the relevance of Collins’ principles to policing and how their application can move law enforcement agencies and other public-sector organizations to a higher level of effectiveness.

“Good to Great” Policing: Application of Business Management Principles in the Public Sector, 66 pages

Cover: Community Policing Explained: A Guide for Local GovernmentsWhat is community policing?
A joint effort of the Office of Community Oriented Policing Services and the International City/County Management Association, this guide serves several purposes. It will help communities determine the questions they need to ask about community policing and guide them in how to tailor community policing to their community’s needs and resources. Finally, it will help managers and administrators of local governments determine how to measure the effectiveness of their approach to community policing. This guide is available online only.

Community Policing Explained: A Guide for Local Governments, 54 pages

Ensuring the success of problem-oriented policing initiatives
The processes of analyzing the nature and extent of problems and developing suitable responses is often considered, but relatively little attention is paid to the process of implementing the responses effectively. This guide deals with the process of implementing problem-oriented policing initiatives and discusses the four key stages of implementation: (1) preimplementation, which addresses the factors to consider before implementation; (2) planning, during which the specific mechanics and systems that will be used to implement the initiative should be considered; (3) implementation, in which responses should be put in place, monitored, and adjusted; and (4) postimplementation, in which the successes and failures of implementation should be considered.

Implementing Responses to Problems, Problem-Oriented Guides for Police, Problem-Solving Tools Series No. 7, 78 pages

Report reveals trends in delinquency cases in juvenile courts
Juvenile Court Statistics 2003–2004 describes delinquency cases handled between 1985 and 2004 by U.S. courts with juvenile jurisdiction and status offense cases handled between 1995 and 2004. The data were compiled by the National Juvenile Court Data Archive, which the National Center for Juvenile Justice maintains for the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention. This report serves as a barometer of trends in juvenile crime. The estimates are derived from data provided by nearly 1,900 courts with jurisdiction over 77 percent of the juvenile population in 2004.

Juvenile Court Statistics 2003–2004, 172 pages

Safeguarding our nation
This CD–ROM is a collection of intelligence-related resources that includes the popular Office of Community Oriented Policing Services publication Law Enforcement Intelligence: A Guide for State, Local, and Tribal Law Enforcement Agencies. Additional materials include The National Criminal Intelligence Sharing Plan, Intelligence-Led Policing: The New Intelligence Architecture, Fusion Center Guidelines, 28 CFR, Sharing Intelligence Information (an FBI brochure), and Protecting Your Community from Terrorism: Strategies for Local Law Enforcement, Volume 4: The Production and Sharing of Intelligence.

Law Enforcement Intelligence: A Guide for State, Local, and Tribal Law Enforcement Agencies CD–ROM

Cover: Measuring Excellence: Planning and Managing Evaluations of Law Enforcement Initiatives Evaluating law enforcement initiatives
Developed by ICF International with funding from the Office of Community Oriented Policing Services, this guide provides practical information and advice for conducting evaluations that recognize the unique challenges of police work—evaluations that can withstand rigorous scrutiny and help build community trust and support. This user-friendly resource includes practical exercises and is designed for those in law enforcement who would like to improve their evaluation of local programs.

Measuring Excellence: Planning and Managing Evaluations of Law Enforcement Initiatives, 170 pages